Open Source Archive

Technology Predictions for 2010

Razorfish’s Matt Johnson outlined his predictions for content management over at our CMS blog, www.cmsoutlook.com. Many of his predictions will hold true for web technology at large as well. I see traction and opportunities for:

  • Cloud Options:We will see further movement towards cloud solutions, and more vendors providing SaaS alternatives to their existing technologies. It ties into the need for flexibility and agility, and the cost savings are important in the current economic climate.

  • APIs and SOA:Functionality will be shared across many web properties, and the proliferation of mini apps and widgets will content. APIs are becoming a critical element of any succesful solution. This is also driven by the increased complexity of the technology platform. Solutions we now develop frequently incorporate many different technologies and vendors, ranging from targeting and personalization to social capabilities.

  • Open Source:Not only in content management, but in many other areas, Open Source will start to play an important role. Examples are around search, like Solr, or targeting with OpenX. Cloud computing also further drives the expansion of Open Source. As companies are looking to leverage cloud solutions for agility, the licensing complications with commercial solutions will drive further open source usage.

What do you see as additional trends?

Keeping the cloud open

I really like Matt Asay’s article on why we need to focus on keeping the cloud open and less about keeping the operating system open. If you think of the cloud as an ‘array’ of applications and less of a hosting solution it starts to open up the aperture on it’s true potential. Imaging the ability to stitch together applications across the cloud like you can stitch together data. Basically a yahoo pipes for applications not just data.

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Cloudfront, Amazon's Caching Delivery Network (CDN)

Speed differences between Amazon S3 and CloudF... Image by playerx via Flickr

It’s nice to see Amazon moving into the CDN space with their Cloudfront offering, it seems like the CDN market can definitely use some fresh look at the challenge. It looks like it builds off your usage of Amazon S3 but with an accelerator finding the closest cache server to deliver your content. With this approach it doesn’t seem like a great fit as a CDN for any architecture. The chart on the right is an interesting comparison.

I’ve been intrigued over the last couple of years with Coral Caching. Peer to peer open source caching seems like it’s ripe with opportunity, wouldn’t it be cool if my mediacenter pc, apple tv and other laptops that sit at home idle during the day could be leveraged to help offload servers. I guess it’s a balance of saving power and sleeping or turning off the box vs. using less server power.

This is a diagram of a Wikipedia:Peer-to-Peer ... Image via Wikipedia

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